Cone-beam computed tomography in dentistry and oral surgery

Inka, a five-year-old female jaguar, is placed in the cone beam CT scanner for assessment of dentoalveolar structures.

Computed tomography (CT) has revolutionized our ability to detect subtle hard and soft tissue abnormalities of the maxillofacial region. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is creating much buzz amongst veterinary dentists when it comes to dental/maxillofacial diagnostic tools.

What is the difference between CBCT and conventional CT? Rather than a collection of thin, closely spaced slices obtained with a fan-shaped beam of conventional CT, CBCT has both an X-ray generator and detector that rotates around the patient, capturing data with a cone-shaped beam. Both modalities can be used to create very helpful 3-D reconstructions of the areas of interest, although CBCT provides increased detail of dentoalveolar structures. One veterinary study compared CBCT’s diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT sagittal slices. Four blinded evaluators compared CBCT and 64-multidetector row CT images. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, lamina dura and “overall impression” were scored. Images captured with CBCT were found to be significantly superior in image quality when compared to images acquired with 64-multidetector CT in all categories.1

Inka, the jaguar

My first experience with CBCT was with a patient from the Elmwood Park Zoo in Norristown, Pa. Inka is a five-year-old jaguar that fractured a tooth two years prior. Zoo veterinarian Michele Goodman, VMD, felt Inka’s previously fractured right maxillary canine tooth should be reassessed. Two years earlier, the tooth was noted to be fractured and a vital pulp therapy was performed (see my column in the March 2019 of Veterinary Practice News for details on vital pulp therapy procedures). At that time, Inka had a cerebrovascular event perioperatively, which resulted in lasting neurologic issues. Understandably, the zoo’s doctors and staff were concerned about placing Inka under anesthesia again. However, they suspected something might need to be done about that same tooth and possibly others.

With the help of board-certified anesthesiologist Andrea Caniglia, VMD, DACVAA, zoo staff developed a plan to minimize anesthetic complications. The most accessible diagnostic test to assess vitality of the teeth would be intraoral dental radiography. However, in an attempt to save time under anesthesia, I suggested we arrange to have a CBCT scanner on-site. Coupled with the dedication of a company representative equipped with a trailer designed to haul the CBCT, the scanner’s size and mobility allowed for Inka to benefit from this new technology, cage-side.

Another advantage of using CBCT includes its ability to plug into any electrical outlet, along with rapid image generation. One limitation, however, is its decreased ability to assess contrast-enhanced soft tissue structures compared to conventional CT when using intravenous iodinated contrast agents.

Once Inka was sedated, she was placed in the CBCT scanner (Figure 1), and within a few minutes, we were able to assess not only her entire dentition, but also the bones and joints of her head (Figure 2). This allowed for more rapid commencement of treatment and uneventful recovery.

What the studies say

Recent studies from University of California, Davis provide support of widely held assumptions that CBCT offers more detailed information than dental radiography. In small- to medium-sized brachycephalic dogs, when three CBCT software modules were used (i.e. serial CBCT slices and custom cross sections, tridimensional rendering, and reconstructed panoramic views), the diagnostic yield of CBCT was higher than that of dental radiography for assessment of nine of 10 categories, four of which were statistically significant (abnormal eruption, abnormally shaped roots, periodontitis, and tooth resorption). In only one category (loss of tooth integrity) was the diagnostic yield of CBCT lower than dental radiography.2

In a similar study with feline patients, the diagnostic yield of CBCT was higher than that of dental radiography for 13 of 14 categories, four of which were statistically significant (missing teeth, horizontal bone loss, loss of tooth integrity, tooth resorption).3 Both studies concluded CBCT should be considered better suited than dental radiography in diagnosing dentoalveolar lesions.2,3

Will CBCT replace dental radiography in the near future? That’s not likely anytime soon at a general practitioner level, given it’s an expensive piece of equipment. Dental radiography can still provide valuable clinical information in every practice for a reasonable cost. However, more and more specialists are taking the plunge into CBCT. It may not be a tool used on a daily basis, but it’s nice to have available when needed.

John Lewis, VMD, FAVD, DAVDC, practices dentistry and oral surgery at Veterinary Dentistry Specialists and is the founder of Silo Academy Education Center, both located in Chadds Ford, Pa.

References

1 Soukup JW, Drees R, Koenig LJ, Snyder CJ, Hetzel S, Miles CR, Schwarz T. Comparison of the diagnostic image quality of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures obtained by cone beam computed tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography. J Vet Dent. 2015; 32(2): 80-86.

2 Döring S, Arzi B, Hatcher DC, Kass PH, Verstraete FJM. Evaluation of the diagnostic yield of dental radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for the identification of dental disorders in small to medium-sized brachycephalic dogs. Am J Vet Res. 2018; 79(1): 62-72.

3 Heney CM, Arzi B, Kass PH, Hatcher DC, Verstraete FJM. The Diagnostic Yield of Dental Radiography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for the Identification of Dentoalveolar Lesions in Cats. Front Vet Sci. 2019; 6: 42.

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NYC health commissioner wouldn’t supply NYPD with masks

New York City’s health commissioner blew off an urgent NYPD request for 500,000 surgical masks as the coronavirus crisis mounted — telling a high-ranking police official that “I don’t give two rats’ asses about your cops,” The Post has learned.

Dr. Oxiris Barbot made the heartless remark during a brief phone conversation in late March with NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan, sources familiar with the matter said Wednesday.

Monahan asked Barbot for 500,000 masks but she said she could only provide 50,000, the sources said.

“I don’t give two rats’ asses about your cops,” Barbot said, according to sources.

“I need them for others.”

The conversation took place as increasing numbers of cops were calling out sick with symptoms of COVID-19 but before the department suffered its first casualties from the deadly respiratory disease, sources said.

Although surgical masks don’t necessarily prevent wearers from being infected with the coronavirus, they can prevent people from spreading it to others.

An NYPD detective died after contracting coronavirus — the first…

The NYPD has recorded 5,490 cases of coronavirus among its 55,000 cops and civilian workers, with 41 deaths, according to figures released Wednesday evening.

Patrick Lynch, president of the Police Benevolent Association, called for Barbot to be fired over her “Despicable and unforgivable” comments.

“Dr. Barbot should be forced to look in the eye of every police family who lost a hero to this virus. Look them in the eye and tell them they aren’t worth a rat’s ass,” Lynch fumed.

In the wake of Barbot’s crass rebuff of Monahan, NYPD officials learned that the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene had a large stash of masks, ventilators and other equipment stored in a New Jersey warehouse, sources said.

The department appealed to City Hall, which arranged for the NYPD to get 250,000 surgical masks, sources said.

The federal Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency also learned about the situation, leading FEMA to supply the NYPD with Tyvek suits and disinfectant, sources said.

A source who was present during a tabletop exercise at the city Office of Emergency Management headquarters in Brooklyn in March recalled witnessing a “very tense moment” when Monahan complained to Mayor de Blasio in front of Barbot about the NYPD’s need for personal protective equipment, saying, “For weeks, we haven’t gotten an answer.”

De Blasio, who was seated between Monahan and Barbot, asked her, “Oxiris what is he talking about?” the source said.

She was not on the conference call Friday as de…

When Monahan said the gear was vital to keeping cops safe, de Blasio said, “You definitely need it,” and told Barbot, “Oxiris, you’re going to fix this right now,” the source said.

Last week, Barbot — who’s been a routine participant in de Blasio’s daily coronavirus briefings — was noticeably absent when Blasio announced that the city’s public hospital system would oversee a major testing and tracing program, even though the DOH has previously run similar programs.

Hizzoner also heaped praise on the head of NYC Health + Hospitals, Dr. Mitchell Katz, saying, “When you have an inspired operational leader, you know, pass the ball to them is my attitude.”

De Blasio named Barbot the city’s health commissioner in 2018 following the resignation of Dr. Mary Bassett, who took a job at Harvard University’s School of Public Health amid an investigation into the DOH’s failure to alert federal officials to elevated levels of lead in the blood of children living in city housing projects.

“During the height of COVID, while our hospitals were battling to keep patients alive, there was a heated exchange between the two where things were said out of frustration but no harm was wished on anyone,” Department of Health press secretary Patrick Gallahue said, noting that Barbot “apologized for her contribution to the exchange.”

The NYPD declined to comment.

City Councilman Joe Borelli and Congressman Max Rose on Wednesday night joined Lynch in calling for Barbot’s outster.

“I judged the mayor incorrectly for shifting duties away from her if this is how she feels about her job,” Borelli said, referencing de Blasio’s decision to transfer the city’s testing in trace program from the Dept. of Health to Health + Hospitals.

Rose tweeted: “This kind of attitude explains so much about City Hall’s overall response to this crisis. Dr. Barbot shouldn’t resign, she should be fired.”

Additional reporting by Craig McCarthy

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College of Dentistry Opens Center for Disabled | Washington Square News

NYU College of Dentistry opened an Oral Health Center for People with Disabilities. (Staff Photo by Min Ji Kim)

People with disabilities that inhibit oral health treatment now have access to a new center — opened by the NYU College of Dentistry — that is uniquely tailored to their needs.

The aims to create a safe, welcoming environment to treat some of the nearly . The facility includes an accessible circular front desk, wide corridors for easy access and large bariatric treatment chairs that can accommodate wheelchairs. One of the most innovative technologies used in the center can be found in the multisensory room designed to help anxious patients relax.

Dean of the NYU College of Dentistry Charles N. Bertolami said the dental school has been interested for years in finding a way to provide additional assistance to those with disabilities. Targets for treatment include patients in wheelchairs who cannot get into a dental chair, autistic patients who need special accommodations for scheduling an appointment and those who are negatively affected by noisy and crowded waiting rooms.

“We wanted to design a facility that took all of these things into consideration to expand the quality of service we could offer,” Bertolami said.

This new center marks a big step forward in the treatment of disabled people whose oral health often is neglected as a result of inadequate accommodations and a shortage of equipped medical workers.

Marco Damiani is the CEO of the in New York City, the state’s largest developmental disability advocacy organization. The AHRC was a guiding partner in opening the center and Damiani said it was a necessary improvement to current services.

“There is a significant lack of access to oral health treatment for people with disabilities,” Damiani said. “There’s been a history of people with disabilities having their entire mouths of teeth pulled because they can’t communicate clearly.”

The multisensory room is designed to help anxious patients relax. A projector illuminates the room with lights that change color to hyper-stimulate or hypo-stimulate patients based on their needs. Clinical Director of the Oral Health Center for People with Disabilities Ronald Kosinski said that the room improves the experience for those who may otherwise be uncomfortable in a dental chair.

“We bring patients into [the multisensory room] who may be very hypersensitive, who can’t sit in a dental chair, who never have been to a dental chair and don’t like the dental experience and need decompression,”  Kosinski said.

The dental school collaborated with students from Tandon School of Engineering and Tisch School of the Arts in developing the new facility, something that Kosinski said was one of the most important elements of the process. Tandon students helped with the development of a new virtual reality app that patients can use to take a tour of the center.

“The Tandon students have really been amazing,” Kosinski said. “They’re hitting the ground running. Being able to utilize [another] school at NYU and work with them collaboratively is such a pleasure, and it’s working so well because the level of excitement is leveled by the students.”

While the center is now open, the official ribbon-cutting ceremony will take place on April 18. Executive Vice Dean for Finance and Administration at the College of Dentistry Michael O’Connor further emphasized the need for the center and said he hopes that it is widely used.

“This is very much an underserved population, and dentists are not comfortable with dealing with this population,” O’Connor said. “[People with disabilities] get poor — if nonexistent — dental care and we are going to welcome as many of them as want to come and make this their home.”

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Designing a Welcoming Orthodontics Office – Spear Education

With more adults being referred for orthodontic care, it’s necessary to create an office that is welcoming not only for children, but for older patients, as well.

The first thing your patients notice when they walk into your practice is the design. With that in mind, use these office design techniques to make your practice feel more welcoming for patients of all ages.

Adult-friendly amenities

Filling an orthodontics office with toys, video games and family-friendly movies may be a hit for kids. However, the approach does not provide key conveniences for adult patients, who account for one in four of the orthodontic patients in the U.S., according to the American Association of Orthodontists.

“Most ortho practices are set up to be efficient for providers, and attractive to children and adolescents, who are generally their target market,” said Spear Resident Faculty member Dr. Cheryl DeWood.

After 22 years in private practice as a general practitioner, Dr. DeWood chose to pursue an education and career in orthodontics.

Based on her experience as a practicing orthodontist since 2005, Dr. DeWood learned that an office designed around child-like elements fails to make adult patients feel welcome.

“This type of set-up emphasizes a ‘fun’ or juvenile atmosphere and is generally lacking in adult amenities, including private treatment areas,” Dr. DeWood said. “For GPs who are looking to refer adults, this isn’t very appealing.”

“I have been telling my colleagues for years that they are missing a growing part of the ortho market by limiting their ability to accommodate adult patients,” she said.

For example, the ADA Marketplace blog recommends that “stacks of magazines, books or newspapers can help keep the adults happily preoccupied.”

The ADA also encourages having soothing music playing in the office and access to refreshments like coffee and tea.

Effective use of color and light

The color scheme you pick for your practice can have a significant psychological impact on your patient. According the ADA Center for Professional Success, utilizing bright and bold colors like red and yellow can cause your patient’s anxiety to rise, whereas shades like sky blue or cool-toned purples can have more of a relaxing or cheerful effect.

Orange, the complement to blue on the color wheel, can be used for smaller touches in an orthodontics office for a bright accent. But if orange is used too much, it can be overstimulating.

Industry experts also recommend adding a few lamps with warm bulbs to your office to create a sunny, inviting space, or swapping out old light fixtures for lamps with a modern look for a fresh, new atmosphere.

Reduce stress with aquariums

It’s no accident that fish tanks are utilized in numerous dental and health care offices.

A 2015 U.K. study by the National Marine Aquarium, Plymouth University and the University of Exeter found that viewing an aquarium display led to lower blood pressure, lower heart rate and an improvement of mood, and these benefits increase as the number of fish increase.

The study says that “an individual does not need to spend long in front of an (aquarium), just five minutes, to derive significant benefits.”

The ADA Marketplace blog adds that aquariums can be particularly helpful for offices that have pediatric patients but can decrease stress in patients of all ages.

According to the ADA, “not every aquarium has to have the grandeur (or price tag) of a 1,000-gallon tank. A simple tank is a great tool for keeping people calm as the colors, lights and animal life provide a healthy distraction from stress.”

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Health Expert: Concerts Will Return in Fall 2021 At the Earliest

The coronavirus pandemic has already put a hurting on the live events industry. In a feature in New York Times Magazine, they polled five public health experts about when reopening businesses and it’s a grim forecast for concerts, which one expert predicts won’t return before fall 2021 “at the earliest.”

Zeke Emanuel, vice provost for global initiatives and director of the Healthcare Transformation Institute at the University of Pennsylvania was among the experts polled on various aspects of getting daily American life back in motion. He insisted a return to normal functions would have to be “done in stages and it does have to start with more physical distancing at a work site that allows people who are at lower risk to come back.”

In Emanuel’s opinion, “Certain kinds of construction, or manufacturing or offices, in which you can maintain six-foot distances are more reasonable to start sooner.”

However, “Larger gatherings — conferences, concerts, sporting events — when people say they’re going to reschedule this conference or graduation event for October 2020, I have no idea how they think that’s a plausible possibility.” Unfortunately, Emanuel felt these events “will be the last to return,” and he looked ahead beyond one year, noting, “Realistically we’re talking fall 2021 at the earliest.”

Reopening public and work spaces inevitably means there will still be some sort of virus transmission between people, meaning there may be an ebb and flow in regards to the rise and fall in the number of people infected.

“In Hong Kong, Singapore and other places, we’re seeing resurgences when they open up and allow more activity. It’s going to be this roller coaster, up and down,” assessed Emanuel, who added, “The question is: When it goes up, can we do better testing and contact tracing so that we can focus on particular people and isolate them and not have to reimpose shelter-in-place for everyone as we did before?”

Read the complete story here.

In light of the absence of touring, countless artists have pursued the live stream avenue, performing concerts from their homes for fans around the globe. You can keep track of all future live streams of this nature with our Rock + Metal Virtual Performance Streaming Calendar, which is continuously updated.

The Best Metal Song of Each Year Since 1970

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Sanders and Jayapal Put Forth Bill to Provide No-Cost ‘Health Care for All During Pandemic’ | Common Dreams News

As the number of Americans without health insurance continues to rise rapidly due to ongoing mass layoffs across the nation, Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Pramila Jayapal on Friday introduced emergency legislation that would empower Medicare to cover all healthcare costs for the uninsured and all out-of-pocket expenses for those with insurance for the duration of the coronavirus crisis.

“Our broken healthcare system is failing to protect millions of Americans from the coronavirus pandemic,” Jayapal, a Washington Democrat and co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, said in a statement. “Now more than ever, we need to take bold action to prevent more Americans from getting sick or dying.”

“With an estimated 35 million Americans in danger of losing their employer-provided health insurance over the coming weeks and months, this legislation is needed now more than ever.”
—Sen. Bernie Sanders

If passed, the Health Care Emergency Guarantee Act (pdf) would take effect immediately and remain in place until the Secretary of Health and Human Services certifies to Congress that a Food and Drug Administration-approved coronavirus vaccine is widely available to the U.S. public.

The legislation to “provide health for all during the pandemic,” according to a summary (pdf) released by Sanders’ office, would “fully cover the cost of medically necessary healthcare, including prescription drugs,” for the tens of millions of Americans currently without health insurance.

An analysis by Health Management Associates earlier this month warned that the total number of uninsured Americans could rise to 40 million within the next several months if U.S. job losses continue at the current rate.

For Americans with either public or private insurance, “Medicare will cover the copays, deductibles, and other cost-sharing for all medically necessary healthcare, including for prescription drugs,” the summary of the bill states.

“When individuals go to the hospital or doctor, they will provide their insurance information as usual,” the summary explains. “The provider will use this information to bill Medicare—either for the out-of-pocket costs if the individual has another type of insurance, or for all of the care if the individual is uninsured. The patient will not be charged anything.”

“An interesting play. Give people a taste of Medicare for All during this emergency while continuing to advocate for the real thing.”
—Anand Giridharadas, TIME

Additionally, the legislation would ban surprise billing and prevent private insurance companies from limiting coverage or hiking co-pays and deductibles until a COVID-19 vaccine is available.

“During this unprecedented crisis, no one in America should delay seeking medical care because of the cost,” Sanders said in a statement. “If this pandemic has taught us anything, it is that we are only as safe as the least-insured among us.”

“We have got to work together to make sure that anyone in America who is sick—regardless of their income or immigration status—can seek the medical treatment they need during this national emergency,” Sanders added. “With an estimated 35 million Americans in danger of losing their employer-provided health insurance over the coming weeks and months, this legislation is needed now more than ever.”

Sanders and Jayapal are two of the leading advocates of Medicare for All in Congress, and the Health Care Emergency Guarantee Act represents a short-term solution as they work to build support for a national single-payer plan.

“An interesting play,” TIME editor-at-large Anand Giridharadas tweeted in response to the new bill. “Give people a taste of Medicare for All during this emergency while continuing to advocate for the real thing.”

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Less Than One Week to Register for Additive Manufacturing Strategies Summit on 3D Printing in Medicine and Dentistry

Without exception, medicine and dentistry affect everyone – and that means that 3D printing affects everyone. The technology is becoming such a part of the medical and dental industries that sooner or later, everyone who has a medical or dental concern find themselves acquainted with 3D printing – whether it’s through a 3D printed implant or prosthetic, a 3D printed surgical guide or medical model, or even a patch of 3D printed skin. To discuss the present and future of 3D printing in the medical and dental industries, last year 3DPrint.com and SmarTech Markets Publishing hosted a new kind of conference – the Additive Manufacturing Strategies Summit, focused exclusively on 3D printing in medicine and dentistry.

A lot can change in a year. New technologies have arisen, existing technologies have been further developed, and many medical and dental procedures have used 3D printing for the first time. So 3DPrint.com and SmarTech are hosting the summit again, taking place next week over three days. From January 29th to 31st, medical and dental professionals, 3D printing experts, and representatives from business, government and academia will gather in Boston to discuss what is happening in 3D printing, medicine and dentistry right now – and what will be happening in both the near and distant future.

This year, there are separate medical and dental tracks, both with speakers and panels to cover every part of the respective industries. Panel topics include 3D printing in veterinary medicine, bioprinting, implants and prosthetics, and more. Last week we listed several of the speakers who are lined up to give presentations and participate in panels. Here are some more:

There are still more experts lined up to speak at the summit; the only issue for attendees will be deciding who to see at what time. There will also be a start-up competition, which is not to be missed, as some of the newest and most exciting organizations in the medical and dental sector will be competing for a $15,000 investment. Registration for the summit is open now, and if you register by January 24th you will get 25% off. There are several options for registration; a Gold passport which gains you entry to everything in the entire conference; a Silver passport which gains you entry to everything except for the workshops on January 29th; or a one-day Seminar pass only, plus several other options you can check out here.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

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Army Asks Retired Soldiers in Health Care Fields to Come Back for COVID-19 Fight

The Army has a message for its retirees: Uncle Sam wants you to help fight the novel coronavirus.

A message sent by Defense Finance and Accounting Services, which processes and dispenses retiree pay, asked troops who had previously served in specific health care specialties to consider “re-joining the team” to address the current pandemic crisis. It’s signed by Lt. Gen. Thomas Seamands, deputy chief of staff for U.S. Army Personnel, G-1.

“We need to hear from you STAT!” reads the message, obtained by Military.com.

The Army, it states, is gauging the interest of retired officers, noncommissioned officers and more junior enlisted soldiers in assisting service efforts to treat the sometimes-deadly disease. The message does not specify whether retired troops would be returned to active status or serve in some other capacity.

“These extraordinary challenges require equally extraordinary solutions and that’s why we’re turning to you — trusted professionals capable of operating under constantly changing conditions,” the message states. “When the Nation called — you answered, and now, that call may come again.”

The call was addressed to retirees from the following health care-specific military occupational specialties:

The message came with a caveat: retired personnel now working in a civilian capacity in a hospital or other medical facility should make that known. Army officials said they did not want to pull personnel from service they were “providing to the Nation” in that role. They added that former soldiers from a different specialty who were interested in supporting Army efforts should also reach out to communicate that interest.

The call-out directed interested retirees to contact Human Resources Command, Reserve Personnel Management Directorate at Fort Knox, Kentucky, providing contact info and MOS.

As of Wednesday, the Pentagon reported 227 cases of Coronavirus among U.S. troops and 435 total among Defense Department-connected personnel. U.S. cases on Wednesday passed 64,000.

This week, the Pentagon announced that military medical and dental treatment facilities would postpone the majority of elective surgeries, dental procedures and invasive procedures for 60 days as it shifts most resources to fighting the pandemic. A massive relief package moving quickly through Congress Wednesday would triple the number of hospital beds available at these facilities and give the DoD $1.5 billion to open expeditionary military hospitals.

The call to retirees also comes on the heels of a recommendation from the National Commission on Military, National and Public Service for the creation of a “critical skills Individual Ready Reserve” that would serve essentially as a roster of qualified individuals in high-demand fields, likely including health care, on standby to support the Defense Department in times of national emergency. It’s one of 164 recommendations that will be considered by Congress in coming months.

The U.S. Selective Service System also owns a yet-to-be activated standby plan known as the Health Care Personnel Delivery System, colloquially known as the “doctor draft,” that would “provide a fair and equitable draft of doctors, nurses, medical technicians and those with certain other health care skills if, in some future emergency, the military’s existing medical capability proved insufficient and there is a shortage of volunteers.”

That proposed mechanism, however, is designed for use only in wartime and in connection with a broader national mobilization effort, with the approval of Congress and the president.

In a briefing at the Pentagon Wednesday, Air Force Brig. Gen. Paul Friedrichs, Joint Staff surgeon, said he felt generally comfortable that the U.S. military had the resources it needed to continue to fight the virus.

“I’m very comfortable that we’ve analyzed the communities where we have military bases. We’ve looked at what we think their medical requirements would be when an outbreak occurs or if an outbreak occurs in that community,” he said. “Do we have enough health care resources there? Is it the right mix of health care resources? That’s then allowed us to identify what medical capabilities from the military we can offer to help support the whole of government, or to support combatant commands in other parts of the world.”

— Hope Hodge Seck can be reached at hope.seck@military.com. Follow her on Twitter at @HopeSeck.

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Visiting an Orthodontist – Women Fitness Magazine

The Benefits of Visiting an Orthodontist
The Benefits of Visiting an Orthodontist

The Benefits of Visiting an Orthodontist : When we know that something is going wrong with our teeth, a toothache or sensitivity perhaps, we generally think about making an appointment to see a dentist. However, what about when you have a dissatisfaction with your smile?

If you have always been unhappy about the state of your teeth or you just want to see an improvement in your smile, then what you need to do is visit an orthodontist. You may be interested to know that your orthodontist in Stockport can offer various non-surgical treatments that your dentist can’t. Read on to find out what services your orthodontist can provide:

What does an Orthodontist do?

An orthodontist is a qualified dentist who has undertaken years of study to become a specialist. He or she can help adults and children alike with common dental problems using a variety of non-surgical procedures and corrective appliances. These include aligners such as Invisalign or metal braces to correct crooked teeth, but this is just one of the issues an orthodontist can help with.

An orthodontist can diagnose a problem which may not have occurred to the patient, but which has been causing significant difficulties in eating and smiling and could even have been causing pain. These can include:

An incorrect jaw position or jaw joint disorder such as temporomandibular disorder, or night-time teeth grinding can also be diagnosed and treated.

Other services which an orthodontist can provide include:

Why visit an Orthodontist?

Too many people are inclined to simply put up with dental problems, particularly where there are cosmetic anomalies rather than having things fixed. The problem is that if things are not treated, they can go on to become much worse over time.

For example, where the teeth are overcrowded or overlapping, they can be difficult to clean properly. Eventually, this could lead to tooth decay and even gum disease. A gap in the teeth, which is called a diastema, can become larger over time and this can have the effect of pushing adjoining teeth out of position. An orthodontist can correct this by pulling the teeth back together essentially filling in the gap.

Problems with the teeth generally start in childhood and having misaligned teeth, or too many teeth, in childhood can be especially problematic for the child as they grow. Early visits to an orthodontist are advisable where braces will usually be recommended and fitted to precisely correct the child’s problem teeth.

Gum Disease

Dentists will always advise on how to prevent gum disease and will tell you that the best way is to practice correct oral hygiene through regular brushing and flossing of the teeth, and using the correct type of toothbrush and toothpaste. Unfortunately, gum disease is still a problem which if left untreated can have far-reaching effects.

Gum disease begins with plaque, which if not properly removed turns into tartar. This build-up can cause the gums to become sore and inflamed. Tartar is very difficult to remove and can only be removed professionally by your dentist or orthodontist.

When teeth are misaligned or overcrowded, there is a greater likelihood of developing gum disease through an inability to clean them properly, but if your teeth are correctly aligned and spaced this likelihood reduces. Corrective orthodontic treatment, along with advice on correct brushing and flossing techniques, will ensure good oral health as well as a healthy smile you can be proud of.

Related Videos about the Benefits of Visiting an Orthodontist :

Why should you care about orthodontics?

The benefits of Orthodontics and Straight Teeth In Children and Adults – Winnipeg Dentist

HOW BRACES WORK

Why orthodontics matters

Why Visit an Orthodontist?

Reasons For Orthodontic Treatment

The Benefits of Visiting an Orthodontist

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ADA president shares the story of dentistry, policy on opioids

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